Sunday, August 30, 2009

CoolThings@UOW- EDU seminar on Learning Designs by Dr Shirley Agostino

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You are invited to attend the following seminar by Dr Shirley Agostinho. See detail below.


Researching in education


Examining the use of a notation system for representing learning designs in higher education 


Dr Shirley Agostinho


Wednesday 2nd September

12.30-1.30pm

67.343 (Dean's Meeting Room)



Abstract

A learning design is a representation of teaching and learning practice documented in some notational form. There is no consistent form of representation for describing and documenting learning designs in education. Instead, several learning design representations have emerged, yet there is little research that investigates how teaching practitioners are using these representations. This presentation will present the findings from my URC grant that examined how a learning design representation, the Learning Design Visual Sequence (LDVS) (developed by an Australian project - www.learningdesigns.uow.edu.au), has been used in higher education. Eleven participants were interviewed to examine how they used the LDVS in their teaching context and how such a notation system could be improved.


Seminar Program Spring 2009 

5th August

Associate Professor Garry Hoban

From Teaching Idea to ARC-Discovery: The Four Year Journey of Slow Motion Animation (Slowmation)

19th August

Lisa Carrington           

Enhancing the development of pre-service teacher professional identity through the use of a virtual learning environment

2nd September 

Dr Shirley Agostinho

Examining the use of a notation system for representing learning designs in higher education 

16th September

Phil Chappell

Looking at Student Interaction using Multi-modal Analysis: some examples and some possibilities

7th October

Catherine Hartung           

Taking apart 'taking part': a post-structural analysis of children's participation

21st October

Rosie Welch

A license to prescribe: primary teachers' thoughts on giving students 'health' advice


Abstracts

Looking at Student Interaction using Multi-modal Analysis: some examples possibilities

Phil Chappell

In my examination of a second language classroom, with a specific focus on how the teacher and the learners enact small group work, I found that an analysis of non-linguistic forms of meaning-making such as as eye gaze, gesture, facial expression and body posture provided some interesting insights into the interactions between the learners. In this presentation, I'll outline the theoretical framework upon which such analyses were based, show some examples from my study, and hopefully stimulate a discussion of the possibilities for multi-modal analysis in other contexts.


Taking apart 'taking part': a post-structural analysis of children's participation

Catherine Hartung

The past few decades have seen increasing global interest in the field of children's participation. While the practice of participation has been informed by a wide range of theoretical sources, a review of related literature indicates the field lacks its own cohesive theoretical framework. Practice, it seems, has outstripped theory. This is in part due to the diverse array of contexts in which children participate, but equally the often conflicting views regarding appropriate interpretation and enactment. In this presentation I will draw on interviews conducted as part of my doctoral research with a variety of key players in the field of children's participation. In highlighting the discourses surrounding these texts, I use post-structural understandings of power, knowledge and the subject to untangle the contradictions and paradoxes in current thinking and practice. By problematising children's participation, this research aims to contribute to closing the gap between theory and practice, while simultaneously opening up new spaces for future possibilities within the field.


 A license to prescribe: primary teachers' thoughts on giving students 'health' advice

Rosie Welch

In recent times increased focus has been placed on Australian school policies and programs to combat obesity. Some of these have materialised as mandatory school physical activity hours, lunch box inspections and various nutritional and physical activity initiatives. Beginning teachers enter schools where such programs exist, but also equipped with a qualification to teach physical and health education curriculum and support young people's wellbeing. Yet little is known about these teachers' individual or collective, values, beliefs and attitudes towards health and the body. The following questions thus merit attention: To what extent do beginning teachers' own experiences, shaped by their biological, social and cultural histories yield meaning? How do current discourses associated with health and the body, especially those circulating in popular media, inform beginning teachers' subjectivities? How do their teacher education programs inform their knowledge?
 
This presentation will report on preliminary data from a doctoral study investigating preservice primary teachers' meanings of health. It will focus specifically on the first two questions by exploring ideations of health and the body along with future teaching intentions as indicated in responses to a survey, one to one interviews and focus group interviews. The analysis drawing on Foucault (1972; 1976) and his notions of power and knowledge and Weber's theory of domination and legitimacy (1968) points to the certainty and authority with which these preservice teachers speak of nutrition and physical activity in relation to young people's weight. For example, this is illustrated by their willingness to provide unqualified advice to students who might want to lose weight: 'Tell them to make sure they exercise by doing something they like, otherwise it will be a chore and they won't do it… substitute fizzy drink for juice or water'. Laker (2000:143) points to the power teachers have in reinforcing particular norms, values and practices through hidden curriculum. The values, beliefs and attitudes and the 'fixed' authority with which the preservice teachers give voice to, thus warrants attention. This paper will focus on the relationship between preservice teachers' personal experiences and their subjectivity as legitimized by the ubiquitous publicity of circulating body and health knowledge. Contemporary discourses in popular media will also be explored in light of how they intersect with the voices of certainty with which these preservice teachers speak.

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Dr Honglin Chen
Senior Lecturer
Director, Postgraduate Research
TESOL Program (on-campus) Coordinator
Faculty of Education 
University of Wollongong
NSW 2522, Australia

Tel: (61 2) 4221 3941
Fax: (61 2) 4221 4657





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